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Effect of Different Vegetable Oils on Sensory Evaluation and Quality of Canned Tuna Fish

Alireza Mousakhani-Ganjehو Ali Toulabi-Monfared, Teymour Rahmati-Kakavandi,  Nafiseh Soltanizadeh. Effect of Different Vegetable Oils on Sensory Evaluation and Quality of Canned Tuna Fish. 2017. Journal of Health System Research. 13 (3): 278-284.

Background: One method for preservation of tuna fish is canning. Since the oil in fish tissue is susceptible to oxidation-reduction and it is separated from fish in the initial cooking, 14-18 percent vegetable oil is added to the canned tuna fish. High temperature and long-time processing in canning lead to the damage of oil in canned foods, especially fish. Therefore, by application of vegetable oils with low sensitivity to oxidation, thermal damage of the oil can reduce considerably. Methods: Vegetable oils including olive, sesame, corn and peanut oils at the amounts of 14, 16 and 18 percent were added to the can containing tuna fish. After canning, the fatty acids profile, peroxide value, thiobarbituric acid index, texture and sensory properties of these products were compared with the commercial canned tuna (containing 18% soybean oil). Findings: The results indicated that canning leads to reduction in the amount of eicosapentaenoic acid and dcoshexanoic acid. Canned tuna fish containing 18 percent sesame oil had the highest oxidative stability. Also, taste panels preferred samples with 18 percent sesame and olive oil in the final product. Conclusion: Since the canned tuna fish containing 18 percent sesame oil had the highest quality and nutritional value, the replacement of soybean oil with sesame oil during canning of tuna fish can be proposed.

Keywords: Canned food, Tuna, Oxidation-reduction, Vegetable oil
 

 

Journal Papers
Month/Season: 
September
Year: 
2017

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